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Archive for the ‘RV18’ Category

Sightings:

The Kauai team logged 259 seal sightings this month. This included 32 individually identified seals.

Feb: 259
Jan: 336
Dec: 270
Nov: 239
Oct: 225
Sep: 354

New Issues:

  • RK90 returned after 6 week absence. Was large and pregnant on 12/28/17 and then sighted on 2/17/18 thin. Likely pupped on Niihau. This would be her first pupping.

Updates on previously reported issues:

  • NG00 is likely still hooked and was not sighted this month. NG00 was observed with a circle hook in lower right lip. Sighted on Niihau in January. Photos match pictures sent in by fisherman along Kaumakani in September of a hooked seal. Seal in good condition, hook not life threatening, will attempt to de-hook next time hauled out on sand.
  • Poipu Keiki Pool: 6 displacements took place this month. Listed below are which seals and how many total times they have been displaced from the keiki pool. Please remember displacements require skilled training and, as always, prior approval from NOAA. Please never attempt this on your own. But please do call the hotline (808-651-7668) when/if you find a monk seal in the Poipu Keiki Pool.
    • RN02 – 3rd displacement
    • RG58 – 1st and 2nd displacement both this month
    • R339 – 4th displacement
    • RV18 – 1st displacement
    • RK90 – 3rd displacement
  • Morbillivirus vaccinations: All vaccines on Kauai have expired. No further vaccinations will occur for the time being.
  • Bleach markings: 2 seals bleach marked this month.
  • Molting activity: 1 seal molted this month.

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(P)update #41

It’s been a little over two weeks since RH92 was tagged. She has been busy exploring up and down the coastline near where she was born, and she’s been making a few friends, too–there’s Temp325, RN44, RN30, 3CU, RK05, RV18 and even recently de-hooked RF28 sporting a tracking device on his back. We have not witnessed her eat any sea cucumbers, as many weaners inevitably do, but she has tried seaweed. Basically, she’s just being a wild monk seal and doing a good job of it, at that.

Here are a few photos of her escapades.

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Photo credit: G. Langley

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Photo credit: G. Langley

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Photo credit: G. Langley

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Photo credit: G. Langley

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Photo credit: G. Langley

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Photo credit: G. Langley

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(P)update #29

RK22 and PK2 had a couple swims today that totaled over four hours and were interrupted for three feedings and a variety of company. In one photo below, you can see a turtle, RN44, RV18, mom and pup. 3CU was also in the area.

Photo credit: G. Langley

Photo credit: G. Langley

Photo credit: G. Langley

By now, PK2’s teeth have started to erupt through her gums. Monk seals have two pair of eight teeth each for a total of 32, just like humans.

Photo credit: G. Langley

Here’s PK3. No confirmed gender yet. Still learning how the body works!

Photo credit: G. Langley

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(P)update #25

PK2 just keeps on getting bigger. And RK22 smaller.

Two swims today one of an hour and a half, then another one hour and forty-five minuets. Three feedings observed.

Males RV18 and RK05 both visited both locations but did not haul out. Also had 3CU and Temp 325 in the area.

Photo credit: G. Langley

Photo credit: G. Langley

Photo credit: G. Langley

Meanwhile, PK3 learns about body control.

Photo credit: G. Langley

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(P)update #15

Mom/RK22 and pup/PK2 were in and out of the water today, racking up a total of four hours swimming. In between, they made good use of a good chunk of the beach.

Throughout the day, five feedings were observed. Speaking of feeding, here’s an interesting fact: The bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) (Mohr, 1952) and the monk seal are apparently the only phocids having four functional teats.

Three male visitors–V18, R336 and 8HY–made visits with just R336 attempting an approach.

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Photo credit: G. Langley

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Photo credit: G. Langley

 

 

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(P)update #14

It’s a girl! We have confirmed our newest Kauai pup is a female.

PK2 turned two weeks old yesterday. In the next week or so, she will start her first molt. That is, lose her shiny black natal coat–often called lanugo. Her molt will happen a single hair at a time. Watch for her muzzle to start to take on a whitish tinge. Typically, new hair will grow in on the face, chest, neck and sides first. Once this process starts, it accelerates quite rapidly until, typically, by the time her mother–RK22–will wean her, she will sport a silvery dorsal and a milky white ventral coat.

Lots of action today. Three males checked on mom–R336, V18 and 8HY. R336 and V18 kept mom busy and 8HY was allowed to get within a few feet of the pup before V18 barged in and ran him off.

Three swims today totaling 3.5 hours in the water. Four feedings observed.

PK2 (RK22)

V18

As he has almost every day since RK22 pupped, the male V18 came by for a look-see.

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(P)update #11

It was another seal-y day. This time, a female, R313, hauled out about 40 feet away from mom, RK22, and pup, PK2. There was no interaction until the male RV18 showed up. Only this time, his interests were focused on R313.

Mom and pup logged an early morning two-hour swim, and a one-hour-and-ten-minute swim in the afternoon. Four feedings were observed throughout the day. 

Photo credit: G. Langley

Photo credit: G. Langley

Photo credit: G. Langley

Photo credit: G. Langley

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